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Neuroscience - 2017 Blog

Wearable systems helps visually impaired users explore and navigate

05

Jun

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Clyto Access

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Conferences

Wearable systems helps visually impaired users explore and navigate

It is a device which provides information from a 3-D camera, via vibrating motors and a Braille interface.

A new system has been developed exclusively for visually impaired that uses a 3-D camera, a belt with separately controllable vibration motors distributed around it, and an electronically reconfigurable Braille interface to give the users more information about their environments.

Scientists were working for decades on automatic navigation systems which help the visually impaired, but it was really very difficult to come up with anything as reliable and easy to use as the white cane.

White cane is a type of metal-tipped cane that is frequently used by visually impaired people o identify clear walking paths. However ,White canes have a few drawbacks. One is that the obstacles they come in contact with. Another is that they can't identify certain types of objects, such as tables or chairs, or determine whether a chair is already occupied.

Many Researchers from Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed a new system which has a 3-D camera, a belt with separately controllable vibration motors distributed around it, and an electronically reconfigurable Braille interface. The Braille interface gives visually impaired users more information about their environments. This wearable system can be used in conjunction with the regular cane or as an alternative to a cane.

The proposed system consists of a 3-D camera worn in a pouch hung around the neck. A processing unit that runs the team's proprietary algorithms; the sensor belt, which has five vibrating motors evenly spaced around its forward half; and the reconfigurable Braille interface, which is worn at the user's side.

The key to the system is an algorithm for quickly identifying surfaces and their orientations from the 3-D-camera data. The algorithm first groups the pixels for the 3-D-camera data into clusters of three. Since the pixels have associated location data, each cluster determines a plane. It doesn't need to determine the extent of the surface or what type of object it's the surface of; it simply registers an obstacle at that location and begins to buzz the associated motor if the wearer gets within 2 meters of it.

To know more about the System, attend the World Neuroscience and Neural Disorders Summit.

World Neuroscience and Neural Disorders Summit.

14-15 September,2017

SanDiego,USA.

References:

www.sciencedaily.com

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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Clyto Access
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Wearable systems | visually impaired explore | Clyto Access

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