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Haematology - 2017 Blog

BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

05

Jun

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Clyto Access

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Conferences

BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

A bone marrow transplantion is a procedure to replace damaged or destroyed bone marrow with healthy bone marrow stem cells. Bone marrow is the soft, fatty tissue inside your bones. The bone marrow produces blood cells. Stem cells are immature cells in the bone marrow that give rise to all of your different blood cells.

KINDS OF BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTS:

Autologous bone marrow transplant: The term auto means self. Stem cells are removed from you before you receive high-dose chemotherapy or radiation treatment. The stem cells are stored in a freezer. After high-dose chemotherapy or radiation treatments, your stems cells are put back in your body to make normal blood cells. This is called a rescue transplant.

Allogeneic bone marrow transplant: The term allo means other. Stem cells are removed from another person, called a donor. Most times, the donor's genes must at least partly match your genes. Special tests are done to see if a donor is a good match for you. A brother or sister is most likely to be a good match. Sometimes parents, children, and other relatives are good matches. Donors who are not related to you, yet still match, may be found through national bone marrow registries.

Umbilical cord blood transplant: This is a type of allogeneic transplant. Stem cells are removed from a newborn baby's umbilical cord right after birth. The stem cells are frozen and stored until they are needed for a transplant. Umbilical cord blood cells are very immature so there is less of a need for perfect matching. Due to the smaller number of stem cells, blood counts take much longer to recover.

A stem cell transplant is usually done after chemotherapy and radiation is complete. The stem cells are delivered into your bloodstream usually through a tube called a central venous catheter. The process is similar to getting a blood transfusion. The stem cells travel through the blood into the bone marrow. Most times, no surgery is needed.

WHY THE PROCEDURE IS PERFORMED?

A bone marrow transplant replaces bone marrow that is either not working properly or has been destroyed (ablated) by chemotherapy or radiation. Doctors believe that for many cancers, the donor's white blood cells may attack any remaining cancer cells, similar to when white cells attack bacteria or viruses when fighting an infection.

Your doctor may recommend a bone marrow transplant if you have:

• Certain cancers, such as leukaemia, lymphoma, myelodysplasia, and multiple myeloma

• A disease that affects the production of bone marrow cells, such as aplastic anemia, congenital neutropenia, severe immune system illnesses, sickle cell anemia, and thalassemia

• Had chemotherapy that destroyed your bone marrow

RISKS INVOLVED IN BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION:

A BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT MAY CAUSE THE FOLLOWING SYMPTOMS:

• Chest pain.

• Drop in blood pressure.

• Fever, chills, flushing.

• Funny taste in the mouth.

• Headache.

• Hives.

• Nausea.

• Pain.

• Shortness of breath.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS OF A BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT DEPEND ON MANY THINGS, INCLUDING:

• The disease you are being treated for.

• Whether you had chemotherapy or radiation before the bone marrow transplant and the dosages of such treatments.

• Your age.

• Your overall health.

• How good of a match your donor was.

• The type of bone marrow transplant you received (autologous, allogeneic, or umbilical cord blood).

COMPLICATIONS MAY INCLUDE:
• Anaemia..

• Bleeding in the lungs, intestines, brain, and other areas of the body.

• Cataracts.

• Clotting in the small veins of the liver.

• Damage to the kidneys, liver, lungs, and heart.

• Delayed growth in children who receive a bone marrow transplant.

• Early menopause.

• Graft failure, which means that the new cells do not settle into the body and start producing stem cells.

• Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a condition in which the donor cells attack your own body.

• Infections, which can be very serious.

• Inflammation and soreness in the mouth, throat, esophagus, and stomach, called mucositis.

• Pain.

• Stomach problems, including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting.

International Conference on Blood Disorders and Haematology 2017 is intended to providing an international platform for the exchange of knowledge on vast area of Blood Disorders and Haematology. International Conference on Blood Disorders and Haematology 2017 organised by ClytoAccess focuses on the theme “Novel Research and Advance studies on Blood Disorder and Haematology” will explore the different fields of Hematology like Pediatric Hematology, Hematopathology, Immuno Hematology. Attend the conference to more about Gynaecology and Obstetrics.

International Conference on Blood Disorders and Haematology 2017

21-22 September,2017

SanFrancisco,USA.

Contact us :

haematology@clytoaccess.com

+1-619-471-1648

References:

https://medlineplus.gov

www.healthline.com

www.cancer.net

https://bethematch.org

https://www.cancer.gov

Author Details: 
Author Name: 
Clyto Access
Meta title: 
Bone Marrow transplantation | Haematology 2017 | Clyto Access

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